The last day in the Corbett National Park: Bengal Tiger and awesome diversity of woodpeckers

The tip of the day: be the first and be satisfied. We followed this philosophy and our car departed first from the Dhikala camp. This proved to be a perfect idea as soon after we left the camp our guides found a very fresh pug mark of a patrolling Tiger. Our guides knew we were on track to get it. It was supposed to be ahead of our jeep somewhere on the dirt road. Following the fresh and huge pug marks I suddenly spotted him, a male Bengal Tiger, at a turn. That was an extraordinary moment. Despite his slow and majestic walk it claimed respect. We soon started to photograph it on the yet very dark track.

Bengaltiger1

This image is unsharp and blurred but clearly reflects the conditions and the atmosphere of the moment when we fist saw this Bengal Tiger. © Gyorgy Szimuly

Bengal-tiger_001_800px

It was one of the many breathtaking moments of the day when the Tiger turned back and leisurely started to move towards us. © Gyorgy Szimuly

Bengaltiger2

Last moments before he disappeared in the small dry stream bed. © Gyorgy Szimuly

Unfortunately the next car arrived too late, well after the tiger disappeared in the forest. Soon after we lost the sight of the male large number of jeeps and tourists were waiting for it without any success. Of course we were proud and we were continuously asked for showing the images of this beautiful animal.

Cardown

Reparation of a failed car in the territory of a Tiger is not the funniest task. © Gyorgy Szimuly

On our way back to the camp, for checking out and our late breakfast, we enjoyed birding as we were full of satisfaction. Notable species were a Black-necked Stork, Lesser Yellownapes, Streak-throated Woodpeckers, Himalayan Goldenback, Lesser Goldenbacks, Greater GoldenbackRufous WoodpeckersRufous-gorgeted Flycatcher and Crested Buntings.

Dhikala1

Garden of the Dhikala Camp. © Gyorgy Szimuly

Reservoir

Reservoir from the garden of Dhikala camp. © Gyorgy Szimuly

Commonmyna

Common Mynas were feeding in the garden of the tourist camp. © Gyorgy Szimuly

Asian-barred-owlet_001_800px

Asian Barred Owlet was roosting on a tree at the entrance of the camp. © Gyorgy Szimuly

Grassland

The reservoir is surrounded by grasslands where the feeding Crested Buntings were found. © Gyorgy Szimuly

White-capped-water-redstart

White-capped Water-Redstart was one of the most common species in the bed of the Ramganga river. © Gyorgy Szimuly

Dhikalaregion

Many dirt road had been flooded during monsoon disabling access to the finest sites. © Gyorgy Szimuly

After leaving the camp we explored the grasslands around the bank of the reservoir. Unfortunately the water level was way too high for entering the local speciality, the Stoliczka’s Bushchat’s habitat, although we saw and photographed a bird what was an unusual stonechat, but we did not proceed with identification. Birds seen on the lowland were Red-headed VulturesEastern OspreyCrested Serpent Eagle, Changeable Hawk-Eagle, Collared Falconet, Brown Crake, Plain Martin, Oriental Skylark, Graceful Prinia, Ashy Prinia, Lesser Coucal, Booted Warbler, Rusty-cheeked Scimitar Babbler (), Citrine Wagtails, Red-throated Pipit and Scaly-breasted Munia.

Bayaweavercolony

Baya Wevers nest colony in the grassland. © Gyorgy Szimuly

Changeablehawkeagle

Changeable Hawk Eagle was appearing on a tree in front of our car. © Gyorgy Szimuly

On our way out of Corbett National Park we had some nice birds including 4 Kalij Pheasants, feeding alongside the road, Pallas’s Fish Eagle, Lesser Fish Eagle, Tawny Fish Owl, Pin-tailed Green PigeonsSlaty-headed ParakeetsCrested KingfisherOriental Pied HornbillsLineated Barbet, Blue-throated Barbets, Crested Treeswifts (a flock of 120), Rufous Treepies, Large Cuckooshrike, Lesser Racket-tailed Drongos, Common Woodshrike, Slaty-blue Flycatcher and Black-crested Bulbul.

Crested-treeswifts

Dead woodland was the home of a hundred of Crested Treeswifts. © Gyorgy Szimuly

Dscn2656

Beautiful Corbett forest tunnel. © Gyorgy Szimuly

Kalij-pheasant_002_800px

Finding some feeding Kalij Pheasants was one of the benefit of birding from an open jeep. © Gyorgy Szimuly

The evening and the night we spent again in the comfortable Tiger Camp Resort. The dinner was awesome.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s